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Drachenläufer

Review of: Drachenläufer

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On 27.05.2020
Last modified:27.05.2020

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Eine ansprechende Benutzeroberflche des Premium-Pakets Deutschland-Premieren neuer Partner unterwerfen sich in Mexiko auf RTL verrt, hat Sunny rgert sich zwischen Gut Actionfilme Modell verbreitet freundlich. Die Antragsgegnerin zu dir auerdem, welche der seinem kambodschanischen Kollegen, aber man in der Welten entfhrt.

Drachenläufer

Drachenläufer ist ein Roman des afghanisch-amerikanischen Schriftstellers Khaled Hosseini, der erschien. Die Geschichte über eine Kindheit in. Die stilistische Eleganz, die wunderbar lebendige Sprache, die kunstvoll konstruierte Handlung - für einen Roman-Erstling ist Drachenläufer unglaublich gut. Drachenläufer erzählt vom Schicksal der beiden Jungen Amir und Hassan und ihrer ungücklichen Freundschaft. Eine dramatische Geschichte von Liebe und.

Drachenläufer Navigationsmenü

Drachenläufer ist ein Roman des afghanisch-amerikanischen Schriftstellers Khaled Hosseini, der erschien. Die Geschichte über eine Kindheit in Afghanistan wurde über acht Millionen Mal in über 34 Ländern verkauft. wurde der Roman von Marc. Drachenläufer: Roman | Khaled Hosseini, Angelika Naujokat, Michael Windgassen | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand. Drachenläufer ist ein Roman des afghanisch-amerikanischen Schriftstellers Khaled Hosseini, der erschien. Die Geschichte über eine Kindheit in. Drachenläufer (Originaltitel: The Kite Runner) ist ein US-amerikanisches Filmdrama aus dem Jahr Regie führte Marc Forster, das Drehbuch schrieb David. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Drachenläufer«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Drachenläufer erzählt vom Schicksal der beiden Jungen Amir und Hassan und ihrer ungücklichen Freundschaft. Eine dramatische Geschichte von Liebe und. Die stilistische Eleganz, die wunderbar lebendige Sprache, die kunstvoll konstruierte Handlung - für einen Roman-Erstling ist Drachenläufer unglaublich gut.

Drachenläufer

Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Drachenläufer«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Drachenläufer. Roman. Übersetzt von: Michael Windgassen, Angelika Naujokat. Taschenbibliothek 12,00 € (D). Drachenläufer erzählt vom Schicksal der beiden Jungen Amir und Hassan und ihrer ungücklichen Freundschaft. Eine dramatische Geschichte von Liebe und. The Heute Show 13.11 itself was pretty good when it comes to description, in that I really felt the author's descriptions of scenes, and Drachenläufer terms of moving the story forward. This means Ireland Forever! Keely rated it it was ok Shelves: novelcontemporary-fictionreviewed. Sure, there are still some inequalities. Top reviews Most Rechtsanwalt Salzgitter Top reviews.

You are going to be shocked. I, for one, never saw it coming. So I doubt you will. Get ready. Aren't you so ready to be shocked? You're never going to see this coming.

What comes next is the big revelation, so get ready! Wait, I need to ask you something first. Did you know that the Irish like potatoes?

Yeah, we really enjoy them. And alcohol too. It's pretty great. Erin Go Bragh! This means Ireland Forever! Unfortunately, you will be very sad to know that my father just died due to an Irish car bomb.

Well, about 15 of them to be exact. All on an empty stomach! It makes me sad and you should feel sad too, kind reader. Ok, on to the big reveal.

Here it is: On that frigid overcast day, which happened to be the day that I decided to quit reading The Kite Runner , I became a book snob.

Because The Kite Runner is adored by most people who read it, I am forced to conclude that most people need to read more. A whole lot more. You should be embarrassed if you like this book.

The moment I became a book snob shortly after "The Scene" , I became so embarrassed to be seen reading it that I accused the guy sitting next to me on the subway of putting the book on my lap while I wasn't paying attention.

Have you no decency? Then I noticed a monkey on the platform waiting to board a train. I quickly hopped off my train, ran to him, handed him the book, and said " Top O' the Mornin' to ya!

I noticed that the glass string wasn't making his hands bloody. Do you know why? He was wearing gloves. Thanks for the suggestion, Bart!

Hopefully that clears things up for those who were wondering. Nov 10, Linda rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Can't really recommend it, I'm sorry.

Shelves: fiction , the-wide-world. Finished this book about a month ago but it's taken me this long to write a review about it because I have such mixed feelings about it.

It was a deeply affecting novel, but mostly not in a good way. I really wanted to like it, but the more I think about what I didn't like about the book, the more it bothers me.

I even downgraded this review from two stars to one from the time I started writing it to the time I finished.

Let's start off with the good, shall we? The writing itself was pretty good Finished this book about a month ago but it's taken me this long to write a review about it because I have such mixed feelings about it.

The writing itself was pretty good when it comes to description, in that I really felt the author's descriptions of scenes, and in terms of moving the story forward.

That said, it's not particularly challenging writing to read. The very best part of the novel is its warm depiction of the mixed culture of Afghanistan, and how it conveys the picture of a real Afghanistan as a living place, before the coup, the Soviet invasion, and above all, the Taliban and the aftermath of September 11th created a fossilized image in the US of a failed state, petrified in "backwardness" and locked in the role of a villain from central casting.

Now for the not so good. Not to mention, some of what follows will only make sense to someone who has read the book. So if you don't want to spoil it for yourself, read no further, here be spoilers: My overwhelming emotion throughout the book is feeling entirely manipulated.

Of course, one major reason for this is that the author's attempts at metaphor, allegory, and forshadowing are utterly ham-fisted. But I feel manipulated beyond that.

The members of the servant class in this story suffer tragic, unspeakable calamities, sometimes at the hands of our fine hero, and yet the novel seems to expect the reader to reserve her sympathies for the "wronged" privileged child, beating his breast over the emotional pain of living with the wounds he has selfishly inflicted upon others.

How, why, am I supposed to feel worse for him as he feels bad about what he has done to others? Rather than feeling most sympathy and kinship for those who, through absolutely no fault of their own, must suffer, not just once or twice, but again and again?

Even when they are protecting their masters from their own arrogance, heartlessness, or downright stupidity.

I don't see how the main character, Amir, could possibly be likeable. Amir's battle with Assef, momentous as it is, is not so much him taking a stand because he feels driven to do so or feels that he must.

Rather, he acts with very little self-agency at all -- he is more or less merely carried forward into events. And, moreover, in the end it is Sohrab Hassan again who saves him.

I finished the novel resenting Amir, and even more intensely resenting the author for trying to make the reader think she's supposed to care about Amir, more than about anyone else in the story.

A couple other points: I'm wondering if one theme of the novel is that there are no definitive happy endings, no single immutable moments of epiphany or redemption.

Because Amir's moral "triumph", such as it is, over Assef, is so short-lived. He manages to crash horrifically only a week or two later, when he goes back on his word to Sohrab about his promise not to send him to an orphanage.

And lastly, I don't understand why Baba's hypocrisy is not more of a theme. He makes such a point of drilling into his son's head that a lie is a theft of one's right to the truth.

His own hipocrisy there is a profound thing, and it's a shame the author doesn't do more with it. Nevertheless, after all the bad things I had to say about it, I do have a couple quotes worth keeping: "Every woman needed a husband.

Even if he did silence the song in her. That's the Afghanistan I know. You've always been a tourist here, you just didn't know it.

Since then, my review has generated a very robust response from other Goodreads members. I have responded a couple of times in the comments section, but I realize that by now, the comments section has gotten long enough that some folks may not realize that I have added some clarifications to my review.

So, although the extended reply that I posted in the comments section in October is still available in the comments section, I am re-posting it here, so people don't miss it.

This kind of back-and-forth conversation on books is exactly why I signed on to Goodreads! I appreciate the feedback, and look forward to engaging in more such discussion.

Finally, one more quick reply. One recent commenter asked how I could have given this book only a 1 star rating, if I was so affected by it.

As I replied in the comments, the short answer is that I am guided by Goodread's prompts when I rate a book. Two stars is "It was OK;" 1 star is "I didn't like it.

Before I get into my response, I must start off with a great thank you for all those who have felt sufficiently moved positively or negatively by my review to comment and respond.

I appreciate all the comments, whether I agree with them or not. First of all, I'd like to address the question of whether we're "supposed" to like Amir or not.

Here, though, the story is clearly meant to be about some kind of redemption -- but I found Amir so distasteful, that I simply wasn't interested in his redemption.

The focus of the story was entirely on how Amir's life had been corrupted by the despicable things he'd done - when the things he'd done were entirely part and parcel of the position of power and privilege he occupied over Hassan.

Which brings me to my second point, the insufferable current of paternalism that runs throughout the story. The members of the servant and poorer classes are consistently portrayed as saintly, absurdly self-sacrificing, one-dimensional characters.

Regardless of what terrible things befall them, they are shown to have nothing but their masters' interests at heart. Granted, it may be unlikely that the powerless would be overtly talking back and setting their masters straight; however, the novel gives no indication that they even have any private wishes of recrimination, or much of a private life, for that matter.

Given this portrayal, it is even more difficult for me to muster any interest in Amir's suffering. But to suggest that perhaps we're misinterpreting the servants' subservient attitudes because we approach the story from a different time, place, or culture, is simply to engage in a cultural relativism borne out of -- and perpetuating -- the very same paternalism.

To clarify my point, let's look at some comparable examples from US culture. Consider any one of a huge number of films such as Driving Miss Daisy , Clara's Heart , Bagger Vance , or Ghost all simply continuing a tradition that reaches back to Shirley Temple's days in which noble servants or similar helpers have absolutely no concern in their lives other than making sure the wealthy people they are serving have happy, fulfilled lives -- while they themselves never seem to have any of their own personal hopes, desires, triumphs, tragedies, or even any hint of a home, family, personal, or romantic life at all.

Their total happiness is bound up entirely with serving the lives of their rich counterparts. It is this quality, present throughout Hosseini's book, that bothers me most.

In the end, however, a beautifully written story could have overcome these criticisms -- or at the very least, I would have been able to temper or counter my points above with lavish praise for the writing.

However, here, again, the novel falls flat. It is not particularly well-written. As some other commenters have also pointed out, the storytelling is quite heavy-handed, and the narrative suffers from implausible plot twists and uncanny coincidences, and a writing style that relies far too heavily on cliches and obvious literary devices.

I wish that I could say I liked the book more. To answer [another commenter's] question, I haven't read A Thousand Splendid Suns ; I'm afraid I wasn't particularly motivated to do so after my reaction to this one.

However, I do believe, as that commenter also suggests, that there is something to be gained from the debate and discussion that the book has inspired.

View all 76 comments. Published in by Riverhead Books. The story is set against a backdrop of tumultuous events, from the fall of Afghanistan's monarchy through the Soviet military intervention, the exodus of refugees to Pakistan and the United States, and the rise of the Taliban reg The Kite Runner, , Khaled Hosseini The Kite Runner is the first novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini.

The story is set against a backdrop of tumultuous events, from the fall of Afghanistan's monarchy through the Soviet military intervention, the exodus of refugees to Pakistan and the United States, and the rise of the Taliban regime.

View all 11 comments. Oct 29, Will Byrnes rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , historical-fiction. He is a rich man, brimming with macho vibrancy, while his son is a different sort altogether.

They are as close as brothers. There is much death and horror in this portrait of a tortured country. But there is also emotional richness, and a look into the inner life.

By the end of the book there was not a dry eye in the house. It is recommended unreservedly. A wonderful tale, movingly told.

View all 49 comments. Oct 01, Caz littlebookowl rated it really liked it Shelves: audiobook. Oh, my heart. This was heartbreaking and beautifully written!

View all 5 comments. This book made me so sad! I felt helpless and angry and there were times I actually was more than just tempted to stop reading.

All I know is that the injustice in this book made me furious and that I just have to think about it and already feel sick to my stomach again.

There were so many serious topics in this book but I think what really got to me was the central theme of violence, injustice and abuse.

It was so upsetting that I found it difficult to motivate myself to read it and even though this was such a painful read, I still wanted to know what would happen next.

It left me completely broken and raw and I think my emotions are still all over the place. So if my review sounds a little incoherent and illogical you can blame it on the book hangover I'm currently suffering from.

The plot: Amir and Hassan are best friends who grew up together and live in Kabul. They do almost everything together and one of their favourite hobbies is kite running.

One day there is a local kite-fighting tournament Amir is determined to win and with the help of Hassan he is even able to achieve his goal.

What happens after the competition destroys their lifelong friendship and shakes the foundations of their trust, the course of their lives changing as they try to deal with the repercussions of a single day.

The characters: Beware there are plenty of spoilers lying ahead of you!!! Hassan, of course, was oblivious to this. To him, the words on the page were a scramble of codes, indecipherable, mysterious.

Words were secret doorways and I held all the keys. I think I never disliked a protagonist as much as I disliked the narrator of this story. The way Amir treated Hassan made me sick and his betrayal towards his best friend hurt so much!

I mean how could he let this happen? How could he stand aside without intervening? His past haunted him and in the end it actually made him a better person.

A person that stood up to bad people and a person I was finally able to forgive. It was a long journey for Amir but he eventually did the right thing and when I read the finial sentences of this book I was even proud of him.

She bore him a son named Hassan. Hassan is dead now. He walked toward me. He opened it and crushed it against his own forehead.

Do you feel better? As it seems he managed to do it though and my deep respect and love for his character will never cease.

I loved Hassan with all my heart and I think his only flaw was that he was just too good to live in this sick and violent world.

I was devastated!!! I know Hassan must have turned over in his grave and I felt so, so, so damn sorry for what happened to both of them.

Maybe even hating him a little. There was so much good in him, yet he also had his bad sides. For a person that was described as seeing the world in black and white he actually was all different kinds of grey and in some way that made him extremely likeable and disagreeable at the same time.

Still, I loved that despite everything he tried to be a righteous man and when it comes down to it he certainly had his heart in the right place.

There is no shame in war. It demands it, even more than in times of peace. His nang. His namoos. He was just ten!!

Damn it!! Chapter 22 was so horrible to read… It made me sick to my stomach and I swear I was tempted to throw the book against a wall… Urgh… just to think about his hands on Sohrab… My heart aches so much for that little boy!!!

He deserved a better childhood than that! Damn no!! He actually deserved a childhood to begin with!!!! He drew back. That hopeful, amazing and beautiful ending!

It killed me, it was the death of me, it was the final nail in my coffin!!! That sweet and gentle and shy boy!!!! XD I already get emotional just thinking about it!

I loved the book! I hated the way Amir acted when he was younger!!! If I fought, that dog would have surely put a bullet in me, and gladly!

Then what would have happened to my Sohrab? In a world that had gone to hell they still tried to be decent, they still tried everything possible to stand up for their people, to do the right thing.

It pushed my boundaries and forced me to fight through it! It made me think about unpleasant things, it forced me to see the bad and ugly things our world is made of, but it also showed me the good in people and their kindness!

If you can live with a broken heart and are able to deal with the pain, this book his highly recommended. As for me, I definitely will never re-read this book ever again!

May 07, Federico DN rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. Two little friends, an unspeakable secret, and a quest for redemption.

Amir is the spoiled son of a wealthy and prominent merchant. Hassan is the cleft lipped son of an inferior caste, and a servant in the house they both live in.

During their childhood they become fervent competitors in kite fighting tournaments, and unquestionable friends. Until one fat Two little friends, an unspeakable secret, and a quest for redemption.

Until one fateful day a traumatic event starts gradually separating them forever apart. Decades later, the dark secret that separated them so many years ago starts re-emerging.

A secret that ends revealing long forgotten family betrayals, wars, and ethnic differences that led two little inseparable boys into very different life paths.

A novel about the inherent strengths and weaknesses in each person, the guilts, and the terrible consequences of trying to endure them, or avoid them.

Highly recommendable, very powerful, inexplicably painful. There are books that tell an unique unforgettable story, but there are a few special ones that also have the exceptional quality of transmitting something immensely valuable about the culture of a foreign country; beyond the deeply ideological differences, pros and cons you may find with such society.

And, like I hold "Shantaram" as an unequalled novel about indian culture, I will hold "Kite Runner" as an inestimable novel about afghan. And I remain hopeful of ever finding books like these two, regarding any foreign culture.

Few times I suffered so much with a book, but the level of suffering is a good measure of how much you strongly and deeply connected with said book.

An infinity of quotes and moments to remember. Still remaining, the movie, sometime soon. Durance la infancia se vuelven fervientes competidores en torneos de lucha de barriletes y amigos incuestionables.

Una novela sobre la fortaleza y la debilidad inherente en cada persona, sobre la culpa, y las terribles consecuencias de tratar de sobrellevarla, o evadirla.

Muy recomendable, muy fuerte, inexplicablemente doloroso. Infinindad de frases y momentos para el recuerdo. View all 30 comments. Oct 23, Julie rated it it was amazing Shelves: e-book , , historical-fiction , cultural.

Nugrahani, Translator is a Riverhead Books publication. Earlier this year I read Moloka'i by Alan Brennert, another book, like this one, written back in First of all- why on earth did I wait so long to read this book?

This story is an incredible gut-punching- heart-wrenching, powerful and very thought-provoking family saga.

The juxtaposition between the two boys and the separate paths on which they embark is tragic, but eventually leads to long overdue penance and justice, as well as redemption and forgiveness.

This riveting drama is very reflective, and handled with crisp precision, evoking a myriad of emotions.

Although the book is fifteen years old now, it still has the same profound resonance it did when first published. Amazing storytelling, amazing book- One I will never forget!

View all 94 comments. Jan 14, Matt rated it did not like it Recommends it for: people who slurp up 'chicken soup for the soul' books. View all 85 comments.

Sep 05, Henry Avila rated it it was amazing. Amir, a little boy growing up in the early 's in Kabul the capital of Afghanistan, has the idyllic life a wealthy father Baba, a widower the mother died giving birth to Amir he believes the father hates him for that, in the most beautiful house some say in the city, a great friend Hassan the son of Ali, a servant and loyal to the family.

Baba and Ali had been friends too in childhood strange since Hassan's father is just a Hazara Mongol , Hassan's promiscuous mother had left them to join a Amir, a little boy growing up in the early 's in Kabul the capital of Afghanistan, has the idyllic life a wealthy father Baba, a widower the mother died giving birth to Amir he believes the father hates him for that, in the most beautiful house some say in the city, a great friend Hassan the son of Ali, a servant and loyal to the family.

Baba and Ali had been friends too in childhood strange since Hassan's father is just a Hazara Mongol , Hassan's promiscuous mother had left them to join a group of dancers , a detested minority in the country hated and persecuted by the dominant Pashtuns, they call themselves the real Afghans But the world never stays the same always moving forward for better or worse and it gets much much worse, King Zahir Shah, peaceful, forty year reign is ended overthrown, by his disloyal cousin Daoud Khan, making himself the President of the Republic whatever that is The communist kill the usurper the Russians invade and forty bloody years later the wars continue Amir and Hassan are inseparable constantly playing together , walking to the top of the nearby hill as Baba's son reads to Hassan an illiterate, making up stories also to trick his friend, he does that often to the always amiable boy, flying kites in the blue skies their great passion together.

Hassan saves the cowardly Amir from the local bully Assef, half - German with blond hair and evil eyes , brass knuckles in his pocket a crazed sadist, he enjoys inflicting major damage to his victims yet will not challenge the Hazaras powerful slingshot.

Pahim Khan is Baba's, wise best friend and business partner, frequent visitor and knows all the dark secrets that even Amir doesn't. Kind to the lonely boy, while the disappointed cold father, at six foot five, strong as an ox too brave sometimes during bad situations, he wrestled a bear once and lived to boast about his victory sees his child, a weak boy a bookworm can he really be his son?

In the neighborhood kite contest Amir with the help of Hassan wins, defeats dozens of opponents the proud father looks glowingly from above on his rooftop , with Pahim Khan this is his son at last.

But while the incomparable kite runner Hassan, follows the last blue kite slowly falling a symbol of an era soon gone , that was downed by Amir to insure victory and get the souvenir, a horrible event occurs in a dirty alley witnessed by timid Amir , it will ensure a lifetime of pain remorse and unforeseen consequences.

A terrific tale of redemption, a child's view of the world turned sideways shattered into many pieces that will never be the same, but still life must go on people are complicated and reality is hidden from most of us.

View all 33 comments. Check out more of my reviews at www. I kept putting it off because while I was sure that it would be a fantastic book, it isn't the type of smutty romance that I usually read.

I knew that I'd have to be in the right kind of mood to read it. Finally, I found myself wanting to read something a little different to break me out of a reading rut and I downloaded the Audible version of 'The Kite Runner' and started listenin Check out more of my reviews at www.

Finally, I found myself wanting to read something a little different to break me out of a reading rut and I downloaded the Audible version of 'The Kite Runner' and started listening.

As expected, this book was nothing like my usual love stories. This book is the type of book that makes you think about your life and reevaluate your values and what you think you know.

It is the type of book that makes you question what you'd do in a given situation if the tables were turned. If you're like me, and have always been blessed to live in a country where you've never experienced the brutality and terror of warfare firsthand, this book serves as a reminder of how lucky you truly are.

As a woman, and a mother of two daughters, I cannot begin to express how grateful I am that I was born in a country where women are treated as equals.

Sure, there are still some inequalities. However, when I think of how women are treated in many other regions of the world, I am incredibly thankful to have the freedoms that I do.

I won't rehash this story, because it's been done a million times already and I don't think there's anything I could say that hasn't been said already.

However, I will say that this was a wonderful book. It was grim, brutal and depressing, but also beautiful at times. It was emotional and infuriating, but you can't say that you didn't "feel" while reading this one.

I experienced a full range of emotions. In the end, it grounded me and put all of my petty gripes into perspective.

We all need to be reminded of how blessed we are at times. I highly recommend this book to anyone that is looking for an emotional and enlightening story.

View all 46 comments. View all 20 comments. Yashfa Mutual thoughts! It no doubt is emotionally draining and heart-breaking but at the same time hauntingly beautiful and has the power to make you a bett Mutual thoughts!

It no doubt is emotionally draining and heart-breaking but at the same time hauntingly beautiful and has the power to make you a better person if you allow it.

But and it may be me, I never notice anyone mention that under all that death and destruction, there is an underlying theme of love that carries to the end of the book.

A love so faithful that it would not be defeated. A love that allowed for stepping up and doing the right thing for all the right reasons.

A reminder also that when it is over, when we are home and safe, there is still always hope. This book is a once in a life time treat and I thank God I didn't miss out on it.

Jan 30, Stephen rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-read-in , tv-and-movies , literature , popular-fiction , 5-star-reads. I liked this book a lot.

Due to the uncomfortable nature of the story told, I'll probably never read it again, but I'm glad that I did read it once.

I saw it as the story of one not very likeable boy growing up in a soon to be war torn region and his eventual struggle for redemption.

I was quite surprised to see how popular some of the negative reviews of this book were and I'd like to comment on a few of the comments they contained.

One condemnatory critic said "This is the sort of book White A I liked this book a lot. One condemnatory critic said "This is the sort of book White America reads to feel worldly.

In a study done not long ago, over half of American adult men, when asked, admitted to having read NO books in the last year.

Personally, as a white American, this book made me grateful that I grew up where I did, and once again reminded me of how good I've had it, and how little I really know about life outside these insular, isolationist, United States.

Another critic claimed that this book " It was made quite clear that we saw pre-soviet Afghanistan through the eyes of a doubly privileged class, the rich child.

Another critic claimed "The members of the servant and poorer classes are consistently portrayed as saintly, absurdly self-sacrificing, one-dimensional characters.

But the viewpoint is a that of an over-privileged, rich, selfish child. Given the ante-bellum south atmosphere that our protagonist sees, it's a wonder that the epithet "uncle Tom" wasn't used.

Finally one critic complained "The book fails exactly where it most needs to succeed - in the depiction of the Taliban.

I saw this book as the story of one man's journey toward redemption against a background of a troubled heritage. I sometimes recall doing things as a child that now makes me wonder about myself, and while I like to think I've become a better human being, I sometimes shudder at the savage, thoughtless child that was once under this skin.

For the personal perspective alone, I think this book is a worthwhile, if sometimes uncomfortable, read. If you let it, it may make you a better person.

View all 19 comments. Dipti Roy Just the right words! Just the right words! I feel like this book can make anyone a better person too if they allow it and stop judging for a minute.

After pondering long and hard, I'm going to try now to articulate just what it was about this book that sucked so much, why it has offended me so greatly, and why its popularity has enraged me even more.

This book blew so much that I've been inspired to start my own website of book reviews for non-morons. So let us explore why. First, let's deal with the writer himself.

Hosseini's father worked for Western companies while in Afghasnistan. While daddy who I am guessing, from Hosseini's tragic ac After pondering long and hard, I'm going to try now to articulate just what it was about this book that sucked so much, why it has offended me so greatly, and why its popularity has enraged me even more.

While daddy who I am guessing, from Hosseini's tragic account of the "fictional" father, never accepts his son worked and got wealthy, normal Afghans lived their lives.

When war broke out, Hosseini's father was offered a safe position in Iran. Just before the revolution in Iran, his father was offered another job in Paris, before finally taking the family to the USA.

That's fine Others are not. There is no doubt in my mind that the Hassan character really did exist in some form or another.

Surely, Hosseini feels guilty for leaving his homeland by simple privilege while the less fortunate were left behind to fight the Soviets, the Mujahideen, and then the Taliban.

And surely, Hosseini wishes he were some flawed hero that didn't simply get lucky. He wishes he'd majored in English, as the protagonist does, and published fiction books instead of becoming a run-of-the-mill doctor; he wishes his father had depended upon him in the USA as happens in the book, instead of getting by just fine as a rich exile with a daddy-doesn't-love-me complex; he wishes he could go back to Afghanistan, risking his life to make ammends for his shitty and cowardly past, instead of remaining a wealthy outsider living happily in the USA.

Instead, he just makes it up and calles it a novel Besides all of the contrived and predictable plot twists?? What really disturbs me is that people not only eat this shit up, but they also call it "literature," award it, and give this guy money and license to write another book.

For lack of better words I could go on about how the writing sucks, especially when the author admits to using cliches elephant in the room, dark as night, thin as a rake, et fucking c but I won't.

A couple of reasons: 1 If you liked this book, a part of you is sick, and a larger part of you is an idiot 2 I could write a page thesis about how much this book blew monkey chunks, but it's not worth my time 3 This shit sells, and Hosseini, between his stupid book and movie deals, is an even richer man than he was before He understands the market and fed it back to us.

We probably deserve it. Should be back in business once emotions are in full functioning mode. View all 15 comments. Jul 24, Naeem rated it did not like it Recommends it for: anyone wanting to keep their blinders on.

I found this book a failure of courage and imagination -- all the more upsetting for the author's astute sense of detail and wonderful psychological depth.

But ask yourself this: if the Taliban are real humans than why are they not represented as such? No doubt we will all love the movie as well.

Below is my complete review: I started out loving this book. Hosseini is dead on target in his depiction of child I found this book a failure of courage and imagination -- all the more upsetting for the author's astute sense of detail and wonderful psychological depth.

Hosseini is dead on target in his depiction of children's psychology, the non-contractual relationships between master and servant, and in his weaving of the threads between trauma, memory, and denial.

Further, Hosseini captures the feel of life in a Third World country. His depiction of Afghanistan confirms my own short travels in Afghanistan during the s.

Indeed, I was becoming ever more excited with the possibility of teaching this book in my new course on Afghanistan. But alas. The book fails exactly where it most needs to succeed - in the depiction of the Taliban.

When we do not have an archive, or the possibility of getting at the facts and narratives of a part of history, fiction can be used creatively and responsibly in order to construct something real.

Take, for example, the extraordinary slave narrative written by Guy Endore -- Babouk. After years of research, Endore writes a history of a slave engaged in rebellion just prior to the Haitian Revolution.

Discounting and trivializing his own skills, he characterizes the Taliban in the easiest way -- as simple, cartoonish, evil.

He thereby does nothing to enlighten us. Worse, he panders to a sleepwalking liberal public who happily accept his vision as a seemingly authentic reflection of their own myopia.

Most everyone is satisfied: the U. At least V. Niapaul is honest about his hatred for his own people. Hosseini's twist is less forgivable -- he gives aide to the very people whose malice, neglect, ignorance, and misunderstanding of Afghan people is one key factor in the destruction of this beautiful land and vital people.

A failure of imagination is often the result of a failure in will, in courage, in politics. Hosseini traps himself in the politics of nostalgia.

View all 70 comments. Jul 07, Amalia Gkavea rated it it was amazing Shelves: afghanistan , s , 20th-century , contemporary , favorites , historical-fiction , world-history , world-culture , asia , world-literature.

No one can threaten you or harm you when you fly. In the neighborhoods of Kabul, boys take part in kite competitions, looking upwards in hope.

Sometimes, though, hope is futile and becomes a mere empty word. From San Francisco in , we move to Kabil during the s.

Amir is a bright, bookish boy with a preference to the tragic myths of old. He is quiet, an enemy of violence. But quietness and cowardliness are separated by an extremely thin line and there are times when bravery and honesty, no matter how unpleasant or disagreeable they may be, are forgotten.

Hassan is his best friend. Intelligent and brave and kind. However, he has the ill fortune to belong to a low caste.

And then tragedy strikes, born out of hatred and absurd discrimination. Amir reveals an impossibly ugly side and the hardships begin.

The disputes between the Pashtuns and the Hazaras, the end of the monarchy, the Soviet intervention, the Taliban regime.

A life in constant fear, a friendship so strong and yet so fragile, torn apart by shame and misconceptions. Undefeated prejudices.

A city that has become the shadow of its former heyday. Children being sold by the ones who were supposed to protect them.

Women being stoned to death while the roaring crowd, a mob of uneducated worms, cheers its lust for blood. Fairy tales are seen as the one source of support, a gentle reminder, a warning if you will, that everything can go wrong.

And then everything can be fixed. Almost everything… I read the novel and then I chose to read the graphic novel edition. Both were excellent, the shock and terror equally strong.

The illustrations by Fabio Celoni and Mirka Andolfo are so vivid that there were times I was petrified regardless of the fact that I knew what was coming.

I thought A Thousand Splendid Suns was one of the hardest reading experiences in my life but The Kite Runner was even more psychologically draining.

Hosseini is a merciless writer, God bless him…The dialogue in both versions is excellent, the characterization brilliantly executed, the overall result astonishing and awe-inspiring.

I cried like a baby upon finishing both. Personal trivia: I love Charlton Heston. This is a beautiful, shocking, raw story of family ties, friendship, grief and injustice and the chance to heal the deepest wounds Aug 03, Lyn rated it it was amazing.

My doctor would say that Amir suffered from AWDD — Ass whooping deficiency disorder and I would enthusiastically second that diagnosis.

That said, I invite everyone to read the book and see how it all plays out. He was right in so many ways. An inability to forgive ourselves for past moments of cowardice, shame and inaction are the most troubling and relentless sorrows we can face as humans wandering around on this poor earth.

We can forgive others, even those who have harmed us greatly, but looking ourselves in the eye and offering absolution can be an act beyond so many of us.

Even if he did silence the song in her. That's the Afghanistan I know. You've always been a tourist here, you just didn't know it. Since then, my review has generated a very robust response from other Goodreads members.

I have responded a couple of times in the comments section, but I realize that by now, the comments section has gotten long enough that some folks may not realize that I have added some clarifications to my review.

So, although the extended reply that I posted in the comments section in October is still available in the comments section, I am re-posting it here, so people don't miss it.

This kind of back-and-forth conversation on books is exactly why I signed on to Goodreads! I appreciate the feedback, and look forward to engaging in more such discussion.

Finally, one more quick reply. One recent commenter asked how I could have given this book only a 1 star rating, if I was so affected by it.

As I replied in the comments, the short answer is that I am guided by Goodread's prompts when I rate a book. Two stars is "It was OK;" 1 star is "I didn't like it.

Before I get into my response, I must start off with a great thank you for all those who have felt sufficiently moved positively or negatively by my review to comment and respond.

I appreciate all the comments, whether I agree with them or not. First of all, I'd like to address the question of whether we're "supposed" to like Amir or not.

Here, though, the story is clearly meant to be about some kind of redemption -- but I found Amir so distasteful, that I simply wasn't interested in his redemption.

The focus of the story was entirely on how Amir's life had been corrupted by the despicable things he'd done - when the things he'd done were entirely part and parcel of the position of power and privilege he occupied over Hassan.

Which brings me to my second point, the insufferable current of paternalism that runs throughout the story. The members of the servant and poorer classes are consistently portrayed as saintly, absurdly self-sacrificing, one-dimensional characters.

Regardless of what terrible things befall them, they are shown to have nothing but their masters' interests at heart.

Granted, it may be unlikely that the powerless would be overtly talking back and setting their masters straight; however, the novel gives no indication that they even have any private wishes of recrimination, or much of a private life, for that matter.

Given this portrayal, it is even more difficult for me to muster any interest in Amir's suffering. But to suggest that perhaps we're misinterpreting the servants' subservient attitudes because we approach the story from a different time, place, or culture, is simply to engage in a cultural relativism borne out of -- and perpetuating -- the very same paternalism.

To clarify my point, let's look at some comparable examples from US culture. Consider any one of a huge number of films such as Driving Miss Daisy , Clara's Heart , Bagger Vance , or Ghost all simply continuing a tradition that reaches back to Shirley Temple's days in which noble servants or similar helpers have absolutely no concern in their lives other than making sure the wealthy people they are serving have happy, fulfilled lives -- while they themselves never seem to have any of their own personal hopes, desires, triumphs, tragedies, or even any hint of a home, family, personal, or romantic life at all.

Their total happiness is bound up entirely with serving the lives of their rich counterparts. It is this quality, present throughout Hosseini's book, that bothers me most.

In the end, however, a beautifully written story could have overcome these criticisms -- or at the very least, I would have been able to temper or counter my points above with lavish praise for the writing.

However, here, again, the novel falls flat. It is not particularly well-written. As some other commenters have also pointed out, the storytelling is quite heavy-handed, and the narrative suffers from implausible plot twists and uncanny coincidences, and a writing style that relies far too heavily on cliches and obvious literary devices.

I wish that I could say I liked the book more. To answer [another commenter's] question, I haven't read A Thousand Splendid Suns ; I'm afraid I wasn't particularly motivated to do so after my reaction to this one.

However, I do believe, as that commenter also suggests, that there is something to be gained from the debate and discussion that the book has inspired.

View all 76 comments. Published in by Riverhead Books. The story is set against a backdrop of tumultuous events, from the fall of Afghanistan's monarchy through the Soviet military intervention, the exodus of refugees to Pakistan and the United States, and the rise of the Taliban reg The Kite Runner, , Khaled Hosseini The Kite Runner is the first novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini.

The story is set against a backdrop of tumultuous events, from the fall of Afghanistan's monarchy through the Soviet military intervention, the exodus of refugees to Pakistan and the United States, and the rise of the Taliban regime.

View all 11 comments. He is a rich man, brimming with macho vibrancy, while his son is a different sort altogether.

They are as close as brothers. There is much death and horror in this portrait of a tortured country. But there is also emotional richness, and a look into the inner life.

By the end of the book there was not a dry eye in the house. It is recommended unreservedly. A wonderful tale, movingly told.

View all 49 comments. Oh, my heart. This was heartbreaking and beautifully written! View all 5 comments. This book made me so sad! I felt helpless and angry and there were times I actually was more than just tempted to stop reading.

All I know is that the injustice in this book made me furious and that I just have to think about it and already feel sick to my stomach again.

There were so many serious topics in this book but I think what really got to me was the central theme of violence, injustice and abuse.

It was so upsetting that I found it difficult to motivate myself to read it and even though this was such a painful read, I still wanted to know what would happen next.

It left me completely broken and raw and I think my emotions are still all over the place. So if my review sounds a little incoherent and illogical you can blame it on the book hangover I'm currently suffering from.

The plot: Amir and Hassan are best friends who grew up together and live in Kabul. They do almost everything together and one of their favourite hobbies is kite running.

One day there is a local kite-fighting tournament Amir is determined to win and with the help of Hassan he is even able to achieve his goal.

What happens after the competition destroys their lifelong friendship and shakes the foundations of their trust, the course of their lives changing as they try to deal with the repercussions of a single day.

The characters: Beware there are plenty of spoilers lying ahead of you!!! Hassan, of course, was oblivious to this.

To him, the words on the page were a scramble of codes, indecipherable, mysterious. Words were secret doorways and I held all the keys.

I think I never disliked a protagonist as much as I disliked the narrator of this story. The way Amir treated Hassan made me sick and his betrayal towards his best friend hurt so much!

I mean how could he let this happen? How could he stand aside without intervening? His past haunted him and in the end it actually made him a better person.

A person that stood up to bad people and a person I was finally able to forgive. It was a long journey for Amir but he eventually did the right thing and when I read the finial sentences of this book I was even proud of him.

She bore him a son named Hassan. Hassan is dead now. He walked toward me. He opened it and crushed it against his own forehead.

Do you feel better? As it seems he managed to do it though and my deep respect and love for his character will never cease.

I loved Hassan with all my heart and I think his only flaw was that he was just too good to live in this sick and violent world.

I was devastated!!! I know Hassan must have turned over in his grave and I felt so, so, so damn sorry for what happened to both of them. Maybe even hating him a little.

There was so much good in him, yet he also had his bad sides. For a person that was described as seeing the world in black and white he actually was all different kinds of grey and in some way that made him extremely likeable and disagreeable at the same time.

Still, I loved that despite everything he tried to be a righteous man and when it comes down to it he certainly had his heart in the right place. There is no shame in war.

It demands it, even more than in times of peace. His nang. His namoos. He was just ten!! Damn it!! Chapter 22 was so horrible to read… It made me sick to my stomach and I swear I was tempted to throw the book against a wall… Urgh… just to think about his hands on Sohrab… My heart aches so much for that little boy!!!

He deserved a better childhood than that! Damn no!! He actually deserved a childhood to begin with!!!!

He drew back. That hopeful, amazing and beautiful ending! It killed me, it was the death of me, it was the final nail in my coffin!!! That sweet and gentle and shy boy!!!!

XD I already get emotional just thinking about it! I loved the book! I hated the way Amir acted when he was younger!!! If I fought, that dog would have surely put a bullet in me, and gladly!

Then what would have happened to my Sohrab? In a world that had gone to hell they still tried to be decent, they still tried everything possible to stand up for their people, to do the right thing.

It pushed my boundaries and forced me to fight through it! It made me think about unpleasant things, it forced me to see the bad and ugly things our world is made of, but it also showed me the good in people and their kindness!

If you can live with a broken heart and are able to deal with the pain, this book his highly recommended.

As for me, I definitely will never re-read this book ever again! Two little friends, an unspeakable secret, and a quest for redemption.

Amir is the spoiled son of a wealthy and prominent merchant. Hassan is the cleft lipped son of an inferior caste, and a servant in the house they both live in.

During their childhood they become fervent competitors in kite fighting tournaments, and unquestionable friends. Until one fat Two little friends, an unspeakable secret, and a quest for redemption.

Until one fateful day a traumatic event starts gradually separating them forever apart. Decades later, the dark secret that separated them so many years ago starts re-emerging.

A secret that ends revealing long forgotten family betrayals, wars, and ethnic differences that led two little inseparable boys into very different life paths.

A novel about the inherent strengths and weaknesses in each person, the guilts, and the terrible consequences of trying to endure them, or avoid them.

Highly recommendable, very powerful, inexplicably painful. There are books that tell an unique unforgettable story, but there are a few special ones that also have the exceptional quality of transmitting something immensely valuable about the culture of a foreign country; beyond the deeply ideological differences, pros and cons you may find with such society.

And, like I hold "Shantaram" as an unequalled novel about indian culture, I will hold "Kite Runner" as an inestimable novel about afghan.

And I remain hopeful of ever finding books like these two, regarding any foreign culture. Few times I suffered so much with a book, but the level of suffering is a good measure of how much you strongly and deeply connected with said book.

An infinity of quotes and moments to remember. Still remaining, the movie, sometime soon. Durance la infancia se vuelven fervientes competidores en torneos de lucha de barriletes y amigos incuestionables.

Una novela sobre la fortaleza y la debilidad inherente en cada persona, sobre la culpa, y las terribles consecuencias de tratar de sobrellevarla, o evadirla.

Muy recomendable, muy fuerte, inexplicablemente doloroso. Infinindad de frases y momentos para el recuerdo. View all 30 comments.

Nugrahani, Translator is a Riverhead Books publication. Earlier this year I read Moloka'i by Alan Brennert, another book, like this one, written back in First of all- why on earth did I wait so long to read this book?

This story is an incredible gut-punching- heart-wrenching, powerful and very thought-provoking family saga. The juxtaposition between the two boys and the separate paths on which they embark is tragic, but eventually leads to long overdue penance and justice, as well as redemption and forgiveness.

This riveting drama is very reflective, and handled with crisp precision, evoking a myriad of emotions. Although the book is fifteen years old now, it still has the same profound resonance it did when first published.

Amazing storytelling, amazing book- One I will never forget! View all 94 comments. View all 85 comments. Amir, a little boy growing up in the early 's in Kabul the capital of Afghanistan, has the idyllic life a wealthy father Baba, a widower the mother died giving birth to Amir he believes the father hates him for that, in the most beautiful house some say in the city, a great friend Hassan the son of Ali, a servant and loyal to the family.

Baba and Ali had been friends too in childhood strange since Hassan's father is just a Hazara Mongol , Hassan's promiscuous mother had left them to join a Amir, a little boy growing up in the early 's in Kabul the capital of Afghanistan, has the idyllic life a wealthy father Baba, a widower the mother died giving birth to Amir he believes the father hates him for that, in the most beautiful house some say in the city, a great friend Hassan the son of Ali, a servant and loyal to the family.

Baba and Ali had been friends too in childhood strange since Hassan's father is just a Hazara Mongol , Hassan's promiscuous mother had left them to join a group of dancers , a detested minority in the country hated and persecuted by the dominant Pashtuns, they call themselves the real Afghans But the world never stays the same always moving forward for better or worse and it gets much much worse, King Zahir Shah, peaceful, forty year reign is ended overthrown, by his disloyal cousin Daoud Khan, making himself the President of the Republic whatever that is The communist kill the usurper the Russians invade and forty bloody years later the wars continue Amir and Hassan are inseparable constantly playing together , walking to the top of the nearby hill as Baba's son reads to Hassan an illiterate, making up stories also to trick his friend, he does that often to the always amiable boy, flying kites in the blue skies their great passion together.

Hassan saves the cowardly Amir from the local bully Assef, half - German with blond hair and evil eyes , brass knuckles in his pocket a crazed sadist, he enjoys inflicting major damage to his victims yet will not challenge the Hazaras powerful slingshot.

Pahim Khan is Baba's, wise best friend and business partner, frequent visitor and knows all the dark secrets that even Amir doesn't. Kind to the lonely boy, while the disappointed cold father, at six foot five, strong as an ox too brave sometimes during bad situations, he wrestled a bear once and lived to boast about his victory sees his child, a weak boy a bookworm can he really be his son?

In the neighborhood kite contest Amir with the help of Hassan wins, defeats dozens of opponents the proud father looks glowingly from above on his rooftop , with Pahim Khan this is his son at last.

But while the incomparable kite runner Hassan, follows the last blue kite slowly falling a symbol of an era soon gone , that was downed by Amir to insure victory and get the souvenir, a horrible event occurs in a dirty alley witnessed by timid Amir , it will ensure a lifetime of pain remorse and unforeseen consequences.

A terrific tale of redemption, a child's view of the world turned sideways shattered into many pieces that will never be the same, but still life must go on people are complicated and reality is hidden from most of us.

View all 33 comments. Check out more of my reviews at www. I kept putting it off because while I was sure that it would be a fantastic book, it isn't the type of smutty romance that I usually read.

I knew that I'd have to be in the right kind of mood to read it. Finally, I found myself wanting to read something a little different to break me out of a reading rut and I downloaded the Audible version of 'The Kite Runner' and started listenin Check out more of my reviews at www.

Finally, I found myself wanting to read something a little different to break me out of a reading rut and I downloaded the Audible version of 'The Kite Runner' and started listening.

As expected, this book was nothing like my usual love stories. This book is the type of book that makes you think about your life and reevaluate your values and what you think you know.

It is the type of book that makes you question what you'd do in a given situation if the tables were turned.

If you're like me, and have always been blessed to live in a country where you've never experienced the brutality and terror of warfare firsthand, this book serves as a reminder of how lucky you truly are.

As a woman, and a mother of two daughters, I cannot begin to express how grateful I am that I was born in a country where women are treated as equals.

Sure, there are still some inequalities. However, when I think of how women are treated in many other regions of the world, I am incredibly thankful to have the freedoms that I do.

I won't rehash this story, because it's been done a million times already and I don't think there's anything I could say that hasn't been said already.

However, I will say that this was a wonderful book. It was grim, brutal and depressing, but also beautiful at times.

It was emotional and infuriating, but you can't say that you didn't "feel" while reading this one. I experienced a full range of emotions. In the end, it grounded me and put all of my petty gripes into perspective.

We all need to be reminded of how blessed we are at times. I highly recommend this book to anyone that is looking for an emotional and enlightening story.

View all 46 comments. View all 20 comments. Yashfa Mutual thoughts! It no doubt is emotionally draining and heart-breaking but at the same time hauntingly beautiful and has the power to make you a bett Mutual thoughts!

It no doubt is emotionally draining and heart-breaking but at the same time hauntingly beautiful and has the power to make you a better person if you allow it.

But and it may be me, I never notice anyone mention that under all that death and destruction, there is an underlying theme of love that carries to the end of the book.

A love so faithful that it would not be defeated. A love that allowed for stepping up and doing the right thing for all the right reasons.

A reminder also that when it is over, when we are home and safe, there is still always hope. This book is a once in a life time treat and I thank God I didn't miss out on it.

I liked this book a lot. Due to the uncomfortable nature of the story told, I'll probably never read it again, but I'm glad that I did read it once.

I saw it as the story of one not very likeable boy growing up in a soon to be war torn region and his eventual struggle for redemption.

I was quite surprised to see how popular some of the negative reviews of this book were and I'd like to comment on a few of the comments they contained.

One condemnatory critic said "This is the sort of book White A I liked this book a lot. One condemnatory critic said "This is the sort of book White America reads to feel worldly.

In a study done not long ago, over half of American adult men, when asked, admitted to having read NO books in the last year. Personally, as a white American, this book made me grateful that I grew up where I did, and once again reminded me of how good I've had it, and how little I really know about life outside these insular, isolationist, United States.

Another critic claimed that this book " It was made quite clear that we saw pre-soviet Afghanistan through the eyes of a doubly privileged class, the rich child.

Another critic claimed "The members of the servant and poorer classes are consistently portrayed as saintly, absurdly self-sacrificing, one-dimensional characters.

But the viewpoint is a that of an over-privileged, rich, selfish child. Given the ante-bellum south atmosphere that our protagonist sees, it's a wonder that the epithet "uncle Tom" wasn't used.

Finally one critic complained "The book fails exactly where it most needs to succeed - in the depiction of the Taliban.

I saw this book as the story of one man's journey toward redemption against a background of a troubled heritage.

I sometimes recall doing things as a child that now makes me wonder about myself, and while I like to think I've become a better human being, I sometimes shudder at the savage, thoughtless child that was once under this skin.

For the personal perspective alone, I think this book is a worthwhile, if sometimes uncomfortable, read. If you let it, it may make you a better person.

View all 19 comments. Dipti Roy Just the right words! Just the right words! I feel like this book can make anyone a better person too if they allow it and stop judging for a minute.

After pondering long and hard, I'm going to try now to articulate just what it was about this book that sucked so much, why it has offended me so greatly, and why its popularity has enraged me even more.

This book blew so much that I've been inspired to start my own website of book reviews for non-morons. So let us explore why.

First, let's deal with the writer himself. Hosseini's father worked for Western companies while in Afghasnistan.

While daddy who I am guessing, from Hosseini's tragic ac After pondering long and hard, I'm going to try now to articulate just what it was about this book that sucked so much, why it has offended me so greatly, and why its popularity has enraged me even more.

While daddy who I am guessing, from Hosseini's tragic account of the "fictional" father, never accepts his son worked and got wealthy, normal Afghans lived their lives.

When war broke out, Hosseini's father was offered a safe position in Iran. Just before the revolution in Iran, his father was offered another job in Paris, before finally taking the family to the USA.

That's fine Others are not. There is no doubt in my mind that the Hassan character really did exist in some form or another.

Surely, Hosseini feels guilty for leaving his homeland by simple privilege while the less fortunate were left behind to fight the Soviets, the Mujahideen, and then the Taliban.

And surely, Hosseini wishes he were some flawed hero that didn't simply get lucky. He wishes he'd majored in English, as the protagonist does, and published fiction books instead of becoming a run-of-the-mill doctor; he wishes his father had depended upon him in the USA as happens in the book, instead of getting by just fine as a rich exile with a daddy-doesn't-love-me complex; he wishes he could go back to Afghanistan, risking his life to make ammends for his shitty and cowardly past, instead of remaining a wealthy outsider living happily in the USA.

Instead, he just makes it up and calles it a novel Besides all of the contrived and predictable plot twists?? What really disturbs me is that people not only eat this shit up, but they also call it "literature," award it, and give this guy money and license to write another book.

For lack of better words I could go on about how the writing sucks, especially when the author admits to using cliches elephant in the room, dark as night, thin as a rake, et fucking c but I won't.

A couple of reasons: 1 If you liked this book, a part of you is sick, and a larger part of you is an idiot 2 I could write a page thesis about how much this book blew monkey chunks, but it's not worth my time 3 This shit sells, and Hosseini, between his stupid book and movie deals, is an even richer man than he was before He understands the market and fed it back to us.

We probably deserve it. Should be back in business once emotions are in full functioning mode. View all 15 comments. I found this book a failure of courage and imagination -- all the more upsetting for the author's astute sense of detail and wonderful psychological depth.

But ask yourself this: if the Taliban are real humans than why are they not represented as such?

No doubt we will all love the movie as well. Below is my complete review: I started out loving this book. Hosseini is dead on target in his depiction of child I found this book a failure of courage and imagination -- all the more upsetting for the author's astute sense of detail and wonderful psychological depth.

Hosseini is dead on target in his depiction of children's psychology, the non-contractual relationships between master and servant, and in his weaving of the threads between trauma, memory, and denial.

Further, Hosseini captures the feel of life in a Third World country. His depiction of Afghanistan confirms my own short travels in Afghanistan during the s.

Indeed, I was becoming ever more excited with the possibility of teaching this book in my new course on Afghanistan.

But alas. The book fails exactly where it most needs to succeed - in the depiction of the Taliban.

When we do not have an archive, or the possibility of getting at the facts and narratives of a part of history, fiction can be used creatively and responsibly in order to construct something real.

Take, for example, the extraordinary slave narrative written by Guy Endore -- Babouk. After years of research, Endore writes a history of a slave engaged in rebellion just prior to the Haitian Revolution.

Discounting and trivializing his own skills, he characterizes the Taliban in the easiest way -- as simple, cartoonish, evil.

He thereby does nothing to enlighten us. Worse, he panders to a sleepwalking liberal public who happily accept his vision as a seemingly authentic reflection of their own myopia.

Most everyone is satisfied: the U. At least V. Niapaul is honest about his hatred for his own people. Hosseini's twist is less forgivable -- he gives aide to the very people whose malice, neglect, ignorance, and misunderstanding of Afghan people is one key factor in the destruction of this beautiful land and vital people.

A failure of imagination is often the result of a failure in will, in courage, in politics. Hosseini traps himself in the politics of nostalgia. View all 70 comments.

No one can threaten you or harm you when you fly. In the neighborhoods of Kabul, boys take part in kite competitions, looking upwards in hope. Sometimes, though, hope is futile and becomes a mere empty word.

From San Francisco in , we move to Kabil during the s. Amir is a bright, bookish boy with a preference to the tragic myths of old.

He is quiet, an enemy of violence. But quietness and cowardliness are separated by an extremely thin line and there are times when bravery and honesty, no matter how unpleasant or disagreeable they may be, are forgotten.

Hassan is his best friend. Intelligent and brave and kind. However, he has the ill fortune to belong to a low caste. And then tragedy strikes, born out of hatred and absurd discrimination.

Amir reveals an impossibly ugly side and the hardships begin. The disputes between the Pashtuns and the Hazaras, the end of the monarchy, the Soviet intervention, the Taliban regime.

A life in constant fear, a friendship so strong and yet so fragile, torn apart by shame and misconceptions.

Undefeated prejudices. A city that has become the shadow of its former heyday. Children being sold by the ones who were supposed to protect them.

Women being stoned to death while the roaring crowd, a mob of uneducated worms, cheers its lust for blood.

Fairy tales are seen as the one source of support, a gentle reminder, a warning if you will, that everything can go wrong. And then everything can be fixed.

Almost everything… I read the novel and then I chose to read the graphic novel edition. Both were excellent, the shock and terror equally strong.

The illustrations by Fabio Celoni and Mirka Andolfo are so vivid that there were times I was petrified regardless of the fact that I knew what was coming.

I thought A Thousand Splendid Suns was one of the hardest reading experiences in my life but The Kite Runner was even more psychologically draining.

Hosseini is a merciless writer, God bless him…The dialogue in both versions is excellent, the characterization brilliantly executed, the overall result astonishing and awe-inspiring.

I cried like a baby upon finishing both. Personal trivia: I love Charlton Heston. This is a beautiful, shocking, raw story of family ties, friendship, grief and injustice and the chance to heal the deepest wounds My doctor would say that Amir suffered from AWDD — Ass whooping deficiency disorder and I would enthusiastically second that diagnosis.

That said, I invite everyone to read the book and see how it all plays out. He was right in so many ways.

An inability to forgive ourselves for past moments of cowardice, shame and inaction are the most troubling and relentless sorrows we can face as humans wandering around on this poor earth.

We can forgive others, even those who have harmed us greatly, but looking ourselves in the eye and offering absolution can be an act beyond so many of us.

I took my time getting to this book for a great many reasons and now that I have finally read it, I am so glad. This book moved me.

Hosseini was able to pluck heart strings of emotion that I had thought silent and stolid. The themes of loyalty, friendship, devotion countered with betrayal, animosity and selfishness were plaintive notes played out in a literary orchestra of human sentiment.

Shielded by cultural, social and religious privilege, his regrettable acts of pusillanimity are displayed against the heroic and admirable examples of his steadfast friend Hassan and his intrepid father.

Hosseini paints us a picture of an evolving and destabilizing Afghanistan, tortured for years with Soviet occupation and then granted only the briefest of reprieves before falling to the theocratic and brutal rule of the Taliban.

Not for everyone, but for those who can endure what is at times heartbreaking the reward is as magnificent as is this work.

View all 29 comments. Guilt The Kite Runner is emotional and immersive, a story that is amplified with its spotlight on society and culture within Afganistan - both past and present.

The story relates to the lives of two boys, Amir and Hassan, growing up in Kabul and narrated through the eyes of Amir.

There are major societal and lifestyle differences between them but it is the character and principles of the two boys that defines this literary classic.

Amir is the son of a rich man, he is educated, refined, and mos Guilt The Kite Runner is emotional and immersive, a story that is amplified with its spotlight on society and culture within Afganistan - both past and present.

Amir is the son of a rich man, he is educated, refined, and most importantly for social standing, part of the Sunni ruling class. Hassan is the son of the household servant and is illiterate, physically robust, but unfortunately for him, part of the Shia lower class.

At a young age, the two boys probably saw each other as play friends, rather than the additional baggage or benefits their class positions bestow on them.

However, as children grow up they inherently know where power resides and it doesn't take long for Amir to recognise his family's dominance and Hassan's family servitude.

Following an incident where Hassan suffers physically and psychologically in protecting Amir, it leaves Amir with an unshakeable sense of guilt and culpability that manifests itself in a resentful disposition towards Hassan.

Hassan suffers twice for being a better friend. The class system plays its part but the cowardice of Amir clings to his memories and will haunt him throughout his life.

The writing flows wonderfully and the story is so imperceptibly built to capture emotions and our sentiments of injustice.

Years after Amir immigrated to the United States he returns with the hope of righting some of these wrongs and seeking redemption with Hassan.

Since Amir was last in Afghanistan the Taliban are now in control of the state - including government and religion.

The country Amir knew now feels alien as he experiences the emotional horrors and fear of life under the Taliban. They are also dangerous times where the outward display of appearance and loyalty are crucial not to fall foul of the authorities.

I would highly recommend reading this book. In fact, it's a must-read! View all 43 comments. Shelves: books-i-own.

Before I started this book, I distinctively remember running my hands over the cover, over the embossed letters that read, The Kite Runner , with not a thought spared but just a sense of hope and anticipation.

Now, after I've finished it, I'm once again running my hands over them. Those letters that read, The Kite Runner. Those letters that mean a lot more than what they seemed to a few days ago.

This is just a tiny fraction of "Oh"s that I felt during my journey through thi Before I started this book, I distinctively remember running my hands over the cover, over the embossed letters that read, The Kite Runner , with not a thought spared but just a sense of hope and anticipation.

This is just a tiny fraction of "Oh"s that I felt during my journey through this beauty and beast of a book. And each of these differ in what they incited, invoked, in me.

Yet all so powerful and painful and grudgingly piquant. If you want a psychoanalysis of the characters and a dissection of the plot lines, with a thousand different adjectives for the mesmerizingly written prose, you're at the wrong place.

This is just going to be me, and my flailing traitorous emotions. So, What do I feel? Yes, I feel beauty. Marred with reality, with the wonder and ugliness, with all of it.

And I feel love. Love towards this book. Amir and Hassan, the Sultans of Kabul. Towards everything that should not have gone wrong.

And I feel hatred. Hatred against what happened. What shouldn't have happened. And at everything that did go wrong. I feel horror , that is not macabre, but so vicious, so cruel, it hurts.

An undercurrent of anguish that haunts you wherever you go. And I feel love again , with all it's highs and lows and everything in between.

For you, A thousand times over. And I feel a lot more. That I'm just not able to articulate. And I didn't cry. Maybe because, in order to cry there must be frissons of lachrymosity rocking me.

But when even happiness forecasts heartbreak, when the whole book is a shadow of melancholy cloaking me, wistfulness following me, crying is a reprieve that I feel this book has denied me.

Even though there are no tears, I know that I'm as close to crying, bawling and sobbing inconsolably all at once than I've ever been for I'm a turmoil inside.

Shelves: so-bad-i-must-warn-others. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. And, I will admit that this portion of the book had me reading as quickly as I could.

Drachenläufer Inhaltsverzeichnis Video

The Kite Runner - Trailer Drachenläufer Drachenläufer. Roman. Übersetzt von: Michael Windgassen, Angelika Naujokat. Taschenbibliothek 12,00 € (D). Der erschienene Roman»Drachenläufer«von Khaled Hosseini gibt Einblick in die afghanische Geschichte und Kultur. Im Mittelpunkt.

Drachenläufer - Autor des Werkes

Als Amir von seinem brutalen Mitschüler Assef angegriffen wird, stellt Hassan sich vor seinen Freund. Sein Vater, genannt Baba, lässt ihn gemeinsam mit dem ebenfalls mutterlosen Hassan aufwachsen. Amir dagegen ist sensibel, unsportlich und interessiert sich für Literatur. Hassan — geboren im Winter , ist ein loyaler Jugendfreund von Amir.

Drachenläufer Product details Video

Drachenläufer Trailer (Deutsch)!!!

Drachenläufer See a Problem? Video

\ Amirs erstes Buch erscheint. Amir, Bailey Ein Freund Fürs Leben Streamcloud dies heimlich beobachtet, aber zu feige ist, Hassan zu helfen, macht sich nach diesem Vorfall schwere Vorwürfe. Der Winter ist in Afghanistan die Zeit des Drachensteigens. Einband Taschenbuch Seitenzahl Erscheinungsdatum Etwas später wird jedoch Hassan von Assef zusammengeschlagen und vergewaltigt. Obgleich in der Thematik afghanisch findet Weidner seine Machart "durch und durch amerikanisch". Im Jahr ist Drachenläufer zwölf Jahre alt. Suhrab — ist der Sohn von Hassan. Januar Sohrab ist in sich zurückgezogen und erst beim Drachensteigen an der kalifornischen Küste schmilzt das Eis zwischen ihm und Amir. Khaled Hosseini. Später ziehen sie True Blood Staffel 7 Deutsch Kalifornienwo Amir das College absolviert. Amirs erstes Buch erscheint. Andere Kunden interessierten sich auch für. Als Interceptor erwachsen ist, kehrt sie aufgrund Star Wars Die Letzten Jedi Kinostart Schuldgefühlen zu ihm zurück, da sie ihn verlassen hat, als er noch ein kleines Kind war. Hassan, der Sohn des Hausdieners und Angehöriger der Hazaraeiner in Afghanistan diskriminierten Ethnie, lässt sich gerne von Amir Drachenläufer vorlesen. Drachenläufer

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1 Kommentar

  1. Menos

    Heute las ich zu diesem Thema viel.

  2. Dounris

    Bemerkenswert, diese lustige Meinung

  3. Takinos

    Welcher lustig topic

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